LAKE GEORGE, N.Y. (NEWS10) – If you’re planning an outing into the Adirondacks, whether for a day trip or a full family vacation, Lake George is a great place to start – but it’s just one of many. The Adirondack Park is full of lakes that are every bit worth the trip, if watery adventure is what you seek.

According to Visit Adirondacks, the Adirondack Park region includes over 3,000 lakes and ponds across its 6 million acres. Some are better for swimming, others for fishing, and still others for boating. Multiple Adirondack organizations and websites have recommendations on where to go to cool off this summer, big and small.

Visit Adirondacks has a list of other major lakes great for a little bit of everything, from beaches to boating and everything in between. Lake George is just one main attraction out of many.

  • Cranberry Lake
    • Named after cranberry bogs that used to grow in the lake. A less crowded major lake in the Adirondacks.
    • 6,995 acres, 38 feet deep
  • Indian Lake
    • 4,255 acres, 39 feet deep
  • Lake Champlain
    • Home to the world’s oldest-known fossil reef, at an estimated 480 million years old.
    • 120 miles long, 12 miles wide, 400 feet deep at some points
  • Lake George
    • “The Queen of American Lakes,” a popular destination with attractions like the Lake George Steamboat Company and Fort William Henry
    • 32 miles long, 3 miles wide
  • Lake Placid
    • Home of the 1980 Winter Olympics. Features views of Whiteface Mountain and the Adirondack great Range.
    • 2,170 acres long, 50 feet deep
  • Long Lake
    • Part of the Northern Forest Canoe Trail. Seaplane rides are available.
    • 14 miles long, half a mile wide, 4,077 acres
  • Mirror Lake
    • Near Lake Placid, at the center of the village of Lake Placid. Hosts the IRONMAN Lake Placid. Popular for toboggan and ice hockey in the winter.
    • 122 acres, 60 feet deep
  • Racquette Lake
    • Home to the historic Adirondack Great Camps. 80 percent of the lake is designated “forever wild.”
    • 4,925 acres, 95 feet deep
  • Saranac Lakes chain
    • Part of the St. Regis Canoe Area, a waterway connecting the Saranac River with Lake Flower, Kiwassa Lake, Oseetah Lake and Lower, Middle and Upper Saranac Lake
    • 17 miles long
  • Schroon Lake
    • Part of the Adirondack Marathon route.
    • 9 miles long, one mile wide, 56 feet deep
  • Tupper Lake
    • Known as the “Highway of the Adirondacks due to its connections to other rivers, streams and ponds
    • 44 miles long, 148 feet deep

Naturally, with so many lakes, everyone has opinions about where the best place is to set sail or share a day in the Adirondacks. Adirondack.net surveyed park visitors on Facebook in 2014, to find out what they think are the best places for a canoe, kayak, paddle boat or another vessel. Here’s what some longtime Adirondack visitors say are the best lakes to take a boat on in the North Country.

  • 4th Lake
  • 6th Lake
  • 7th Lake
  • Black Pond
  • Blue Mountain Lake
  • Cranberry Lake
  • Great Sacandaga Lake
  • Hinckley Lake and Reservoir
  • Lake Champlain
  • Lake George
  • Loon Lake
  • Lower St. Regis Lake
  • Meacham Lake
  • Moose Pond
  • Nicks Lake
  • Paradox Lake
  • Saranac Lake