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Positive Economic Outlook for 2014

From nano-technology to professional ice hockey, 2013 has been full of economic growth. I took a closer look at some of the developments propelling us into the new year.
From nano-technology to professional ice hockey, 2013 has been full of economic growth. I took a closer look at some of the developments propelling us into the new year.
We'll start in May, when Governor Cuomo and Oneida nation leader Ray Halbritter settled a historic land claim, giving the Oneidas exclusive casino rights in CNY. In exchange, New York state will get 25-percent of its slot machine revenue--about 25 percent of that share goes to Oneida County. Seven more casino licenses were approved for New York state--a portion of their revenue--an expected four-million dollars would go towards education in our area.
"Whether we're going to buy computers, whether we're going to put classroom teachers back to work off the layoff list, it just helps," said Utica School District Superintendent Bruce Karem.
Next came Governor Cuomo's announcement of "Nano-Utica," which is expected to create 1,500 new jobs and boost the local economy and housing market. This came as an expansion to the Quad-C project at SUNY-IT, which is now under construction and scheduled to be complete by the end of 2014.
And not just a sign of economic growth but one of pride, the AHL Comets hockey team made their debut at the newly renovated AUD in October--it had been 20 years since professional hockey was played in Utica.
The gun manufacturer Remington Arms of Ilion, whose future was once uncertain, landed a 47-million dollar contract with the Philippines military, bringing confidence back to the village that relies on it.
In December, Governor Cuomo named the Mohawk Valley a "top performer" in economic development and awarded the area 82-million dollars to fund projects like Quad-C.
"The state is starting to take notice of the Mohawk Valley, we are doing well and I think this is just going to add to announcements that are going to happen with nanotechnology in Marcy," said Assemblyman Anthony Brindisi, D-Utica.
And finally, in just the past week, Griffis International Airport of Rome was chosen to be a testing site for drones, this could create nearly five-hundred more jobs around September.
Additionally, the state is continuing to market the Marcy nano-center site, which they say could bring in as much as 45 billion dollars over the next twelve years.
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