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New Year's Eve: A Busy Night For Liquor Stores and Law Enforcement

As many folks prepare for parties and finalize plans to ring-in the New Year Tuesday night, some businesses have been preparing for this night for a long time.
As many folks prepare for parties and finalize plans to ring-in the New Year Tuesday night, some businesses have been preparing for this night for a long time.
New Year’s Eve is one of the busiest days for alcohol sales nationwide and there's no exception here in Central New York. Employees at Bremer's Wines and Liquors in New Hartford say they prepare for New Year’s Eve with extra staff and extra stock.
"Today’s been crazy it's one of the busiest days of the year,” says Cara Scott, Marketing Director for Bremer’s Wines and Liquors.
The door didn't stay shut longer than a minute or two Tuesday at Bremer's. People were hustling and bustling making last minute alcohol purchases before the big night. And the big seller...the sparkly stuff.
"We definitely stock up we definitely make sure we have a large selection of champagne and sparkling wine of the shelves,” said Scott.
Staff members say New Year's Eve is such a busy day the average customer foot traffic per hour is double that of a normal day.
"On a normal Monday or Friday we might have 50 maybe 100 people in here at a really good hour, and right now we have about 250 people in here at a really good hour,” says Scott.
250 people every hour makes for a lot of liquor sales. While the 31st is a night of celebration, local law enforcement officers say it can also be a night of danger.
"We have DWI, what we call, saturation patrols," says Robert Swenszkowski, the Undersheriff at the Oneida County Sheriff’s Department.
The Oneida County Sheriff's Office is taking extra precautions to ensure safety on the roads Tuesday night.
"Enhanced patrols specifically looking for signs of people driving while intoxicated and along with that they set up random checkpoints,” said Swenszkowski.
So, if you're out on the road be cautious of drivers like this:
"People who can't maintain control of their vehicle, they're not staying in their designated lane, they're not signaling, excessive speeds,” says Swenszkowski.
The Undersheriff also says with the winter weather, the roads could be even more dangerous, which is why some are staying off them completely.
"We will not be driving at all, we'll be getting dropped off people have already been almost crashing into me when it's not even night time and people haven't even been drinking yet,” says Marissa Matthews from Ilion.
"No, I’m staying in we'll be drinking at home,” said Teresa Ladue from Utica.
The penalty for a DWI varies based on the situation but ranges anywhere from a fine, to time in jail to even time in prison.

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