65°F
Sponsored by

New Hartford Students Test Drive Robotic Surgery System

Advancements in medical technology are ever changing. One of the latest trends is robotic surgery. The state-of-the-art system costs two and a half million dollars and can be found right here in the Mohawk Valley at the Oneida Healthcare Hospital. Wednesday, the da Vinci robotic system found its way into a classroom at New Hartford High School.
Advancements in medical technology are ever changing. One of the latest trends is robotic surgery. The state-of-the-art system costs two and a half million dollars and can be found right here in the Mohawk Valley at the Oneida Healthcare Hospital. Wednesday, the da Vinci robotic system found its way into a classroom at New Hartford High School.
Some surgeries are now being performed by robotic hands controlled by physicians. The system uses high-definition 3D vision and is said to be less invasive with faster recovery. The New Hartford High school students were truly blown away.
"It was really cool, I mean it's just like I’m actually using my own hands you know, pinching the stuff," says 12th grader Blase Kirkpatrick.
"I thought it was really cool, it's crazy that they can do that," said Brooklyn Grimaldi, a 10th grader at New Hartford High School.
"To how complex this is, it's really cool,” says 10th grader Marina Timmerman.
Health experts describe the da Vinci robotic system like a virtual gaming device for doctors.
"It’s kind of like a video game, you use your fingers and you grasp and with just the slight movement of their fingers they articulate what the arm does,” said Kristy Russ, Nurse Manager for Cervical Services.
Students got the chance to test drive the da Vinci Robot today using coins and rubber bands to simulate a real surgical environment.
"It’s so easy to move and it's really high tech," says Kristin Khaul, an 11th grader.
"Just the feeling of actually using clamps and not your hands for surgery is really cool,” said Grimaldi.
Oneida Healthcare Hospital is the only hospital between Syracuse and Albany with this technology and it's being used more and more every day. Both patients and surgeons are seeing the benefits.
"There are fewer incisions, they have 3D vision, they can articulate their hands in ways they can't articulate normally,” said Russ.
Russ says she has no doubt this robotic medical technology is the way of the future, something potential medical students are excited about.
"I’m looking into being a pharmacist so this could help my major in the future," says Kirkpatrick.
"I was thinking about being a neurologist and this is kind of like it I guess and it made me more interested in it,” said Khaul.
Health experts held another demonstration Wednesday evening in the high school open to parents and anyone in the community to experience the da Vinci robot.

Page: [[$index + 1]]
comments powered by Disqus