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Marcy Nanocenter Could Provide Major Economic Boost

If the Marcy Nanocenter plan is carried out, the chip fabrication plant could not only line the pockets of its employees, but create a ripple effect, benefitting the entire region. This comes after the Nanocenter received as much as 45 billion dollars in financial backing yesterday--something it needed to move forward. Officials and residents I spoke to are hopeful the center will give the area the economic boost it needs.
If the Marcy Nanocenter plan is carried out, the chip fabrication plant could not only line the pockets of its employees, but create a ripple effect, benefitting the entire region.

This comes after the Nanocenter received as much as 45 billion dollars in financial backing yesterday--something it needed to move forward. Officials and residents I spoke to are hopeful the center will give the area the economic boost it needs.

It's no surprise that more jobs means a better economy.

"Our of a base of about 130 thousand jobs which is what we have currently in Utica-Rome, and additional 5,000 good paying jobs I think will have a positive impact," said Richard Fenner, an economics professor at Utica College.

But more employment in opportunities in one industry can create a ripple effect for other area industries. 

"it's not just those jobs, it's the accounting jobs, it's the management jobs, it’s the overall maintenance jobs there are so many different areas,” said Oneida County Executive, Anthony Picente.

And that has residents optimistic that the plans for the Marcy Nanotech Center will be followed through with.

"It will bring new people into the area it will keep our children here who are going to college they don't have to leave us to go elsewhere,” said Cindy Synakowski."

"It would be great for our economy, it would bring a lot of jobs to the local area and boost the economy which I think would be wonderful," said Deborah Stalker.

Along with the obvious benefits that the Nanotech Center could bring to the area, with the growth of the workforce, there could be challenges as well.

"Housing, what the impact will be on local government, and school districts, transportation," said Fenner.

"Housing issues, diversity issues, there are so many various aspects of this that come into play it's one thing to build but there’s a lot of work to be done and there’s a lot of addressing the population base and how we address the growth," said Picente.

But both Fenner and Picente say these are good challenges to be faced with.
Despite yesterday's major financial backing there's still a certain amount of doubt that the Nanocenter will ever come to fruition.

"Great idea if it happens, I hope it does, we'll have to wait and see,” said Joseph Antonelli.

"But sometimes people want to squash these things, but all in all it looks good, everything looks good on paper first, a good marriage looks good on paper, you know,” said Timothy Devena.

But overall, everyone Eyewitness News spoke with was hopeful for the uptick these plants could provide.

"I'm a school bus driver here and I like to have more children on my bus so I’m excited for more jobs, more families, and more things for our community," said Synakowski.

Anthony Picente says if the plan goes through, we could begin to feel this economic growth within five to seven years.

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