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Gov. Cuomo Expected to Speak Speak on Common Core

Those against the Common Core continue to argue that new standards are too rigorous and have been implemented too quickly, among other things. Proponents say higher standards will better prepare kids for college and career. Whichever side you're on, there's no contesting that the common core is one of the most debated topics in the area.

Those against the Common Core continue to argue that new standards are too rigorous and have been implemented too quickly, among other things. Proponents say higher standards will better prepare kids for college and career. Whichever side you're on, there's no contesting that the common core is one of the most debated topics in the area. It began with education Commissioner John King's visit to the area in October to address concerns about the Common Core and to defend it. He was met with an at-times unruly crowd, many of whom demanded his resignation.
"What I saw was a large base of parents and teachers who were very upset, not feeling like this is delivering what was promised, I think that what he's hearing is what's really happening in school districts all around the state and I think it's wise of Commissioner King to lend ear to that," said Mike Schilling.

Subsequently, Commissioner King called off four scheduled town meetings, including one in New Hartford. That prompted an anti-Common Core forum led by a mother of two.
"We actually decided it was a good opportunity, we'll get together in our community," said Jessica McNair.
Then one day in November, parents took their protests to the next level, keeping their kids home from school, and bringing them here to the library instead.
"We're seeing that there's a lot of difficulty with the problems, with the questions and much of it has to do with the fact that it's not age appropriate," said James Guirguis.

And even some students wanted their voices heard.
"They teach you million ways, that's not the right way to multiply or divide before you actually get to be able to do the real thing and then when you go to do the real thing, it's confusing," said Reilly Malloy, a fifth grader.  
But all the while, Commissioner King maintains that the standards will only advance the learning of our students.
"Look any change process comes with the process of change," he said.
Now, the protesters are hoping Governor Cuomo will address their concerns this week.
"To let Governor Cuomo know that we're aware that he has remained silent on the issue of education even though there's been a growing concern by parents, students, parents teachers, about state education reform agenda," said McNair.

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