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World Cancer Day

Today is World Cancer Day--a time to celebrate survivors and renew calls for a cure across our area and beyond. Thousands are marking the day by wearing purple. It's a color that represents cancer and the fight to find better treatment, but for the survivors, today and each day holds even more meaning.
Today is World Cancer Day--a time to celebrate survivors and renew calls for a cure across our area and beyond. Thousands are marking the day by wearing purple. It's a color that represents cancer and the fight to find better treatment, but for the survivors, today and each day holds even more meaning.
"Every day I smell the flowers and every day I breathe the fresh air and I was just really grateful that if it was someone in my family it was me," said Shereen Armstrong.
When diagnosed with cancer, she was given as little as 3 years to live--it's now been nine.
"The one thing I had always given my children was all sorts of material things but not me, I was busy working and that changed," she saidm
Shereen quit her job, and spends her time helping with the family business and mainly, making memories.
"They told me I wouldn't see my daughter graduate, she graduated high school. My oldest daughter has two children, I got to meet my granddaughters," she said.
This year's world cancer day is devoted to busting cancer myths. One of them being, "We don't need to talk about cancer."
"It's been proven that talking about cancer and being open about the diagnosis can often be helpful and healing," said Nancy Borden, Executive Director of the Regional Cancer Treatment Center at Faxton St. Luke's Heathcare.
Another myth--that cancer can't be prevented.
"Living a healthy lifestyle, eating a healthy diet, one third of all deaths are related to tobacco use," said Borden.
The Regional Cancer Center has their very own cancer survivor working right in the building.
It's more than a job for Rosemary Stedman.
"I've worked here for ten years, and I'm ten years cancer-free," she said.
Throughout that time, she's helped countless patients who were going through what she did.
"When I tell them I'm ten years cancer-free they smile they have a little encouragement," said Stedman.
And that's what it's all about, these survivors agree, finding humor and hope in every day.
"Every day I'm thankful, every day I get another day to make a memory," said Armstrong.
 Relay for Life isn't until this summer, but Utica's kicking off the event next Thursday at the Radisson Hotel. There you can hear from cancer survivors and even win some great prizes.
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