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Memories of Murder: Part II

As we reported last night--one month has passed since Utica's first homicide of the year. Still no arrests and no justice for 23-year-old Andre Oliver-Kenney. Tonight we take you to the scene of two more unsolved murders and speak to those who haven't given up on finding their loved one's killer.
As we reported last night--one month has passed since Utica's first homicide of the year. Still no arrests and no justice for 23-year-old Andre Oliver-Kenney. Tonight we take you to the scene of two more unsolved murders and speak to those who haven't given up on finding their loved one's killer.
Two women who seem worlds apart have at least one thing in common--they've both lost brothers to violence and to this day don't know what happened to them or why.
"That's eight years ago, nothing to this day, eight years ago," said Joyce Alford.
She lost her brother in 2005--he was just 22 years old.
"My brother loved to dance, he loved to dance," she said.
Records show John Alford died of blunt force trauma in this Gold Street home in Utica.
"A lot of people know what happened, nobody's not talking as usual but unless something happens to they family they want everybody to join in, search hunt down for the people that did something to they family but to us, please, nobody care about us like they say they do," she said.
Alford left behind a son, who like the rest of the family, may never know what happened to John Alford.
"That's the part that's getting me, not knowing what's going on, not knowing," said Joyce.
A ten minute drive to this apartment complex, and inside you'll find a woman who's been holding on to hope for more than 40 years.
"It went on and on and on and nobody gave us any answers on anything," said Gail Harter.
It's 1971, and Gail says her older brother Tom Dolin visited this Utica restaurant. The next time he was seen, he lay dead in the Barge Canal.
"Tom's pockets were turned inside out and I guess it had to have been a robbery murder, course it was drowning I'm sure of that...because he was found face-down," said Gail.
Days, years, and then decades past, and today Gail doesn't expect to ever know what happened to her brother.
"I can think back when we were kids and how much fun we had, and you never, never know of course but I doubt very much but I pray to God yes," she said.
Tom Dolin may be gone but his legacy lives on--he left behind three children.
"Of course they all have all children and they'd have to explain to them about grandpa and everything and he'd be so proud today to see his family and his grandchildren, you do just wonder what life would have been if this hadn't happened," said Gail.
She recently submitted her DNA in hopes that new technology will shine new light on the case.
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