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Big Bang Frustration

The people in the neighborhood near the Fay street warehouse deal with the headache of construction every day and it’s far from over, with close to two years left on the project. It all started more than a year ago when they got a letter about the impending construction.

The people in the neighborhood near the Fay street warehouse deal with the headache of construction every day and it’s far from over, with close to two years left on the project.

It all started more than a year ago when they got a letter about the impending construction.

"Total shock, totally shocked," said west Utica resident Kenneth Johnson.

"I called and asked if I was going to be at any inconvenience at all. 'No, not at all Mrs. Dye,' "said west Utica resident Renee Dye.

That hasn’t been the case though.

"It's been nothing but chaos when I was never going to be inconvenienced," said Dye.

That includes the construction damaging her roof while taking down the house that was next to hers.

"They've had their adjusters here, but they feel like putting a new roof on my house isn’t acceptable to them. They just want to repair the spot and I don’t think that’s fair," said Dye.

All of it adds to the communities sense that the city doesn’t care about their hardship.

"I feel neglected and forgotten," said Kenneth Johnson.

"We are a forgotten entity in west Utica," said west Utica resident Barbara Mickler.

The people of west Utica feel that the city and the construction workers have no empathy.

"They keep telling us to have patience. It’s going to look beautiful, but patience is short because they're not living over here," said west Utica resident Cheryl Johnson.

 "They don’t have to live here. They go home to wherever they gotta go and they don’t have a whole in their roof and their sidings not broke. They don’t have to live with that, we do," said Dye.

The arterial project still has around two years left to go before its scheduled completion.

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