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Cutting the Fat

Sixty percent of New Yorkers are considered obese or overweight. And some believe that cutting programs to combat the disease could really affect Central New Yorkers' health.
Governor Cuomo wants to trim the fat out of the budget...literally.

Sixty percent of New Yorkers are considered obese or overweight. And some believe that cutting programs to combat the disease could really affect Central New Yorkers' health.

"If I had to ask anyone what the most important thing in their world they would say health,” says Jack Kunkel, health and wellness coach. “We are nothing without our health."

But with budget cuts coming from Albany, health isn't top on the list of priorities. Groups and programs that have helped people lose weight and get healthy could become obsolete if they don't have funding from the state.

"It'll mean less money toward those programs which means you have to regroup and put priorities," says Dr. Jennifer Zuccaro, Greater Utica American Heart Association, president.

If the programs no longer exist to support those seeking health help, some believe this could affect people's success on their weight loss journey.

"When there's a program and you have to be weighed in, you're held accountable it does help,” says Kunkel.

And the American Heart Association hopes to receive $10 million from the state for obesity prevention programs. As of right now, the AHA is in a pool of organizations that will have to split $9.3 million. It's still not clear how much of that will go to the Heart Association.
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